The art of storytelling is alive and well at Shoal Creek Adventist School

20170127_111836_00120170130_140500by Lynn Horton

Students at the Shoal Creek Adventist School in Sharpsburg, GA spent last Friday morning, January 27th, practicing the art of the oral tradition, learning the structure of a narrative, and working on their skills as a storyteller. Led by volunteers from the Southern Crescent Storytellers, the children performed a variety of tales before a delighted audience of parents, students and teachers. Pre K-Wee Ones acted out the “Itsy Bitsy Spider”; a large group of grades 3 to 5 performed “Anansi the Spider and Gingerbread Man,” a nursery rhyme skit created by Neal Peeples; African folk tales, Norwegian stories like “Why the Bear has a Stumpy Tail”, Jewish folk tales, and Trickster tales were told by the older students. Even some of the moms got into the act by performing a Rap version of “The Bremen Town Musicians.” Ethics, values and cultural norms are an important aspect of storytelling from indigenous peoples, handing down stories, history, and the wisdom of elders.  Communities today still benefit from this edifying craft. Anne Wallace will be starting a Beginners Class Wednesdays at 11:35 a.m. at the PTC Library.

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